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Thu, Oct. 31st, 2013 | 10:02 am  slavezombie


fern
slavezombie
illustration
31st October, 2013 © blanket sin – "fern"

It's been awhile since I've devoted entire weekends (free time) to tweaking my blog's css code (and what not) for presentation. Today feels like a weekend because I've been enjoying two consecutive days off work. And if you bother to visit, you might notice that I finally came to terms with the sticky note resting location. I had that image at the top of the page where the banner image goes.

I don't know what or why I tried so hard to get my blog to look like a bunch of incoming faxes, but since I've started tweaking the tranquility ii stylesheet, that kind of was what I had envisioned. It's working out, I guess. There is a term in the blogspot world of blogging known as typecasting, and all it is is people with manual typewriters (hipsters) are snapping a picture of their typewriter generated copies and uploading them onto their site. It's a slow process, yes, but when you consider screenwriting format having so many indentions, tabulations, fixed width spacing and double spacing after a sentence, it's much easier to do than trying to figure out how to incorporate these characteristics in html/css.

So the fax machine theme kinda connects with this vision of creative writing in that I would much prefer it if editors would accept manuscripts in old fashioned hard copy format instead of digital format. I think it's all about analog because, and people don't always see things my way, but, if you've ever attempted to write on a typewriter, you may notice typos and misspelled words that typing on a computer hides from the writer. While it may be quicker to lay down your thoughts on a computer because you don't have to scurry around looking for the correct spelling in a dictionary, most people reading your typos are still going to guess what you were trying to say, spelling errors and all. I just saying, IMO the process of computers taking over starts there. I just don't want a computer to tell me what the correct spelling of a word is, that's all.

So, returning to the banner issue of a faxing machine themed blog, I'm slowly going to figure this banner image I want to design that will convey the idea of analog ms vernacular. I visualize the Internet slowly bringing reading back as a favorite pastime over TV. I think there's so much competition between cable networks that TV isn't satisfying anymore because people want to watch what they don't have a subscription to, and they default to channel surfing ending up watching crap.

Hey, if I was a librarian, I might even be able to find those hidden video streams for popular shows online and post the links in my blog making TV enthusiasts return for their weekly TV fix of American Horror Story and House of Cards. I mean, I'm one to talk about increasing reading habits as I can channel surf my life away (as I have been doing.) I simply read slowly and it takes a great deal of effort to entice my interest in fiction. Probably, the only people I'll ever see returning to my blog will be those with a particular taste in the production of moving pictures. That is, if I get any good at it.

These screenplay scene posts I upload are bits and pieces of the great American screenplay I write. The story revolves around the life of a loser who can't find happiness because he's so distraught over having lost his first love. He is a loser because his one true love is still in this world. He just can't bring himself to get closure from the hurt he feels from having cheated on her when she wouldn't put out. I don't expect the other half of the population to see eye to eye with me -- and that's pretty much where my writers' block set in -- and thus far, it's the reason I don't take myself seriously as a screenwriter and try to protect my writing from being used by independent filmmakers. If it's any consolation at all to the gender conscious, we kill the loser in the end.



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