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Thu, Apr. 20th, 2017 | 11:04 am  ⅊ United States, California, exp ‏‏␦ blank slavezombie


Here's how Sony (and big motion picture production companies) makes couch potato screeners drool
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This kind of thing, I imagine, must happen to a lot of movie goers who rely mostly on their Internet to get the movies they want to watch. It's cheaper, more convenient, and have the option to watch with subtitles from the comfort of your home. The thing I find most irksome is when a movie contains a seasonal theme, because movie goers love to watch movies when they relate to the holidays they revolve around. Bad Santa is perfect for Christmas time, horror flicks are perfect for halloween, etc.


It goes without saying that people anxious to see the new releases may sometimes forget all about them by the time they're available on on-demand. There is no set formula for calculating when a movie premiers on cable, on-demand and DVD. I don't know of any web sites that focus on this kind of thing. I tried imdb dot com, rotten tomatoes dot com, and the-numbers dot com. When my friend told me about a scifi flick she is interested in seeing, she mentioned it to me when it wasn't even available in theatres. I remember when I use to have HBO. Every once




stats taken Apr 19, 2017


in a blue moon, they premiered movies even before they debuted in theatres. While they didn't do this regularly, I was always glued to that channel while channel surfing to see what I could see before anybody else.

Sony has a film coming out soon called LIFE. I couldn't find anything about it on my Roku device, and there's been more than one movie made by the same title, so finding the one my friend was talking about was less than easy.




I discovered two different posters for it, which might've been the reason I didn't see it on www.apple.com/trailers either. What I did find was box office stats and how they stack up against similar genre flicks. My theory is that the decision to release a film for on-demand viewing depends on how much money was used in the production of the

film and how much profit they are making in comparison with similar films. You can see that LIFE spent almost double the amount in production than SOURCE CODE. Also, according to the-numbers dot com, you can see that SOURCE CODE did really well their first month compared to LIFE (thus far); unless the statistics are flawed.


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