Bier de Stone (slavezombie) wrote,
Bier de Stone
slavezombie

I crave a new/old chicken

Nobody likes genetically altered food, but why am I craving an alternate chicken like the dodo bird? An article in the Science journal describe advancements made in DNA sequencing which will open the doors to cloning a woolly mammoth. The discovery, scientists claim, will pave the road to reconstruct mitochondrial genomes of ten animals.

The scientists who focus their research on DNA molecules believe cloning a prehistoric animal such as a mastodon is within their reach in the next 50 to 100 years. Considering that a beast that size would require millions of dollars, the proof of cloning a sheep or a dog doesn't seem justifiable in their cause. I would like to see a small miracle like an entirely extinct species like the dodo bird replicated as demonstration of their plight to wield the hand of god. Otherwise, what good would a hairy elephant do in a world in which society only seeks black gold from a decaying prehistoric corpse? At least with a chicken-like creature, people can make an omelette.

And will the age old question "What came first?" be solved? Cloning a woolly mammoth could only be beneficial to musicians. Since it's a mammal, philosophers will still be in a quandary. To this day, elephant meat is not a delicacy, but ivory is precious. You can read more about the mitochondrial DNA discovery in the following article:


No bones about it, Ice Age fur is found rich in DNA

by Karen Kaplan
LA Times §A4 Friday 28 Sept 2007


It is a pity the dodo couldn't make it out of Mauritius Island to a colder climate where its DNA might've been preserved in ice. It isn't a bird that lays golden eggs, after all. Yet, I can't stop thinking of what literature would be like without its extinction and whether or not Alice in wonderland would be the same if the chicken egg, for breakfast, were replaced by a dodo egg. If creativity had any value in society at all, scientists would be mixing their discovery of woolly mammoth DNA with that of the Raphus Cucullatus, but I think god's already been there and done that with the ostrich. Nobody thinks ostrich eggs are worth cooking BTW either.
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