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Fri, Jul. 29th, 2016 | 02:41 pm  slavezombie


Redder ink (my continued research to find out if red ink from the 1930's, if stored over time, becom
slavezombie

Evan Lindquist, Old Ink Recipes
http://www.evanlindquist.com/othermedia/oldinkrecipes.html

Standard for Government Writing Ink
(Federal Specification, TT-I-563, Ink; Writing)

This formula was written originally to provide ink for use in post-office lobbies, where the conditions are devastating to pens. This standard ink is similar to some of the commercial writing inks. ...

The formula for the standard writing ink is:

Tannic acid, 11.7 grams
Gallic acid crystals, 3.8 grams
Ferrous sulphate crystals, 15.0 grams
Hydrochloric acid, "dilute", S.S.P., 12.5 grams
Carbolic acid (phenol), 12.5 grams
Dye (C.I. 707; Sch. 539), 1.0 gram -- (NOTE: Explanation of this dye is in Appendix, the last page).
Water (distilled is best) to make a volume of 1 liter at 20 degrees C (68 degrees F).
From Circular of the National Bureau of Standards C413, "INKS"
U.S. Department of Commerce, Issued December 28, 1936
By C. E. Waters

Standard for Government Writing Ink Powder
Ferrous Sulphate Ink Powder, Iron Gallate Inks
Many formulas exist for making ink powder to produce writing fluid of good keeping quality, low acidity, and satisfactory permanence. Ink will keep longer without depositing sediment if it is made without tannic acid, but with an increased amount of gallic acid. It is possible to replace the usual hydrochloric or sulphuric acid by less than an equivalent quantity of a solid organic acid. ... The weight of ferrous sulphate called for, 15.0 grams, contains 3 grams of iron.

Gallic acid crystals, 10.0 grams
Ferrous sulphate crystals, 15.0 grams
Tartaric acid, 1.0 gram
Soluble blue (C.I. 707; Sch. 539), 3.5 grams -- (NOTE: Explanation of this dye is in Appendix, the last page).

Dissolve ingredients in enough water (distilled is best) to make total volume of 1 liter. Variations in the type of dye and the amount of air in the bottle may cause formation of sediment. ...
From Circular of the National Bureau of Standards C413, "INKS"
U.S. Department of Commerce, Issued December 28, 1936
By C. E. Waters

Tannin ink for writing on celluloid

Ferric chloride, 10 parts
Tannin, 15 parts
Acetone, 100 parts
 
Dissolve the ferric chloride in a portion of the acetone and the tannin in the residue, and mix the solutions.
Gardner D. Hiscox and Prof. T. O'Connor Sloane, Fortunes in Formulas, [New York: Books, Inc.], 1957

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